port books or local customs accounts of Southampton for the reign of Edward IV

Cover of: port books or local customs accounts of Southampton for the reign of Edward IV |

Published by Cross and Sharland in Southampton .

Written in English

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Edition Notes

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Statementedited by D. B. Quinn with the assistance of A. A. Ruddock.
SeriesPublications -- no.37.
ContributionsQuinn, David B., Ruddock, A A.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14132500M

Download port books or local customs accounts of Southampton for the reign of Edward IV

Get this from a library. The port books, or local customs accounts of Southampton for the reign of Edward IV. [David B Quinn; Alwyn A Ruddock; Southampton (England)]. Southampton port book project (The Port Books or Local Customs Accounts of Southampton for the Reign of Edward IV,i–71, ed.

Quinn, with the assistance of A.A. Ruddock (Southampton Record Soc., xxxvii, )). 3 Quinn Papers, boxfolder Cited by: 1. Southampton Record Office, SC5 4/7, fos.

Probably the local port due of 'pontagium': see The Port Books or Local Customs Accounts of Southampton for the Reign of Edward IV, ed. Quinn and A. Ruddock (Southampton Record Soc., vol.

xxxvii, I), i, EHR Apr. Audio Books & Poetry Community Audio Computers, Technology and Science Music, Arts & Culture News & Public Affairs Non-English Audio Spirituality & Religion. Librivox Free Audiobook. Full text of "The port books of Southampton" See other formats.

The Port Books or Local Customs Accounts of Southampton for the Reign of Edward IV. by D. Quinn with the assistance of E. Ruddock. Vol. i, II47I. Southampton Record Soc., no. Southampton: Cox & Sharland. The Red Book of Worcester, containing surveys of the Bishop's Manors and other records chiefly of the twelfth and thirteenth.

VII; The Port Books or Local Customs Accounts of Southampton for the Reign of Edward IV, ed. Quinn, D. and Ruddock, A. A., Southampton Record Society, 37–8 ( – ); Southampton Civic Centre, Local Port Books for –5 and –5.

They became research partners and edited the Port Books or Local Customs Accounts of Southampton for the Reign of Edward IV, published in and Ruddock earned her PhD in She taught in Southampton's History Department untilwhen she moved to Birkbeck College at the University of London where she became Reader in History in The Port Books Or Local Customs Accounts of Southampton for the Reign of Edward IV by D.

B Quinn and Alwyn A Ruddock | 1 Jan Unknown Binding. (d) 15th Century. — Treatise in English Verse on the Philosopher's Stone and Aurum Potabile ; in twelve chapters, with a Preface and concluding Recapitulacio. — Placed with the Choice Writings.

(e) Port Books. — Books of Accounts of Water-BailifFs, and Receivers of Petty Customs of the Port of Southampton. Part of the Palgrave Studies in the History of Finance Series book series (PSHF) Abstract The port books: or local customs accounts of Southampton for the reign of Edward IV, Southampton: Cox & Sharland,vol.

II, pp. xxv-xxvi; Ruddock. The Linked Data Service provides access to commonly found standards and vocabularies promulgated by the Library of Congress. This includes data values and the controlled vocabularies that house them.

Datasets available include LCSH, BIBFRAME, LC Name Authorities, LC Classification, MARC codes, PREMIS vocabularies, ISO language codes, and more. The publication of these books began nearly fifty years ago with the Port Books of Southampton,edited by P.

Studer for the Southampton Record Society, Two port books or local customs accounts of Southampton for the reign of Edward IV book volumes, comprising the surviving Port Books for the reign of Edward IV and edited by D.B.

Quinn, were published by the Society in " - from the Preface. For additional notices of paper in the Southampton port books, see Studer, Port Books, 78; and D.

Quinn, The Port Books or Local Customs Accounts of Southampton for the Reign of Edward IV, Publications of the Southampton Record Society 37 and 38 (Southampton, UK: Cox and Sharland, Ltd., ), 2:, and (). Port Books: Yearly Accounts of Water-Bailiffs and Receivers of Petty Customs of the Port of Southampton:— Edward IV.

Four dateless and otherwise defective books: 4: Town Court Book –3 A.D. 1" " A.D. 1" " –3 A.D. Quinn edited with her “assistance” a two-volume work on the port books, or local customs accounts, of Southampton, for the reign of Edward IV.

When the first volume came out inRuddock was only Ruddock’s association with Quinn was longstanding but often brittle.

Books on clothes, furs, and the fur trade are of varying merit, but have been included since so few books deal directly with the subject.

Customs Accounts. Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer: Enrolled Accounts: Wardrobe and Household. Quinn, D. and Ruddock, A. (eds.), The Port Books of Southampton for the Reign of Edward IV, – found: Italian merchants and shipping in Southampton,t.p.

(Alwyn A. Ruddock) found: The port books or local customs accounts of Southampton for the reign of Edward IV. Books at Amazon.

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The Port Book of Southampton, Vol. I (Weeks ), Southampton Record Society 32 (Southampton, UK: University of Southampton, ) See also D. Quinn, The Port Books or Local Customs Accounts of Southampton for the Reign of Edward IV, Vol.

However, the duplicate set of books exists only for one period - Henry VI ().1 Moreover, these two accounts books are virtually identical and even seem to have been written by the same clerk. Exchequer clerks, therefore, did not regard the particulars as documents of much importance once the enrolled account had been made up.

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Cambridge Core - British History after - Law Courts and Lawyers in the City of London – - by Penny Tucker. Edward died inonly 40 years old. His reign having went a little way to restoring the power of the Crown.

His eldest son and heir Edward V, a could not succeed him because the king's brother, Richard III, Duke of Gloucester, declared Edward IV's marriage. Ramsey, 'Overseas trade in the reign of Henry VII: the evidence of the customs accounts', Economic History Review, VI () Conyers Read, Mr Secretary Walsingham and the Policy of Queen Elizabeth, Vol.

III (Clarendon Press, Oxford, ), pp. [Deals with the frauds Walsingham committed while he was farming the customs of the outports ]. England in the Late Middle Ages concerns the history of England during the late medieval period, from the thirteenth century, the end of the Angevins, and the accession of Henry III – considered by many to mark the start of the Plantagenet dynasty – until the accession to the throne of the Tudor dynasty inwhich is often taken as the most convenient marker for the end of the Middle.

Edward I (17/18 June – 7 July ), also known as Edward Longshanks and the Hammer of the Scots (Latin: Malleus Scotorum), was King of England from to Before his accession to the throne, he was commonly referred to as The Lord Edward. The first son of Henry III, Edward was involved from an early age in the political intrigues of his father's reign, which included an outright.

In – Pope Sixtus IV., at the instance of King Edward IV., issued a bull of anathema against all who molested the islands; it was formally registered in Brittany inand in France in ; and in this way the islands acquired the right of neutrality, which they retained till In the same reign (Edward IV.).

At the start of the Middle Ages, England was a part of Britannia, a former province of the Roman local economy had once been dominated by imperial Roman spending on a large military establishment, which in turn helped to support a complex network of towns, roads, and villas.

At the end of the 4th century, however, Roman forces had been largely withdrawn, and this economy collapsed. Childhood. Edward was born at Windsor on 12 November The queen was attended at the birth by Henri de Mondeville, surgeon to her father, Philippe IV of France (r.

Isabella herself wrote to the citizens of London to announce the birth, and the news was greeted with great celebrations. Her yeoman John Launge and his wife, Joan, the queen's lady, were later granted a joint.

The Black Book of Southampton, vol.2, Southampton Record Society, vol. 14 with many others. Dated at Southampton, 2 Junein the twenty-first year of the reign of King Edward IV. DISCUSSION. Saxon Hamwic was an undefended settlement. After its residents relocated in the tenth century to a new site, which would develop into Southampton.

I saw a copy of this book today at a local book shop in case it interest others: by Thomas Penn Description: Winter King tells the unforgettable story of Henry VII's time as King, and the fraught and unstable birth of Tudor England.

Rich with incident and drama, filled with wonderfully drawn characters, it is a stunning history of pageantry, surveillance, the thirst for glory - and the first.

Dan Jones is the author of The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queen Who Made England, a #1 international bestseller and New York Times bestseller, and Wars of the Roses, which charts the story of the fall of the Plantagenet dynasty and improbable rise of the writes and presents the popular Netflix series “Secrets of Great British Castles” and appeared alongside George R.R.

Edward IV’s younger brother, Richard III, claimed the throne on the grounds that Edward and Elizabeth’s children were illegitimate. Edward’s reputation as a womanizer and Elizabeth’s image as a schemer suited Richard’s purposes and continue to appear in popular.

Walter ULLMANN, The Development of the Medieval Idea of Sovereignty, in:p. 1 Melvin C. WREN, The Disputed Elections in London inin:p.

34 Edward HUGHES, Sir Charles Trevelyan and Civil Service Reform, Part I, in:p. 53 Reviews of Books, p. 89 Dorothy M. WILLIAMSON, Some Aspects of the Legation of Cardinal Otto in. Two Dissertations Upon the Mint and Coins of the Episcopal-Palatines of Durham Noble Mark NEW English and Irish coins of Henry VIII bearing.

The Port Books or Local Customs Accounts of Southampton for the Reign of Edward IV, 2 vols. Southampton Record Society, XXXVIIXXXVIII (), 11, p. 43 from there carried breastplates, saletts, shoulderplates, leg harness and even complete harnesses, as well as lances, daggers, and ~ p u r s.

6 ~ amounts by the The later fifteenth. Edward IV (second reign, ), Groat, g, a mule of Edward IV and Henry VI types, London, m.m.

short cross fitchée/restoration cross, obverse in the name of Edward IV, small trefoils on. Three of them were deposed and murdered (Richard II, Henry VI and Edward V). Two d It is a long time since the first publication of “The Stripping of the Altars” and in that time it has become a classic account of the spirituality and religious practices of 15th century England/5(60).

PREFACE. The following sheets contain the substance of a course of lectures on the Laws of England, which were read by the author in the University of Oxford. His original plan took its rise in the year ; and, notwithstanding the novelty of such an attempt in this age and country, and the prejudices usually conceived against any innovations in the established mode of education, he had the.

Edward, Earl of March was crowned King Edward IV on June Margaret was attainted before Parliament for intending the destruction of the realm with the aid of northerners, the Scots and the French.

(The attainder against her would be reversed by the Tudor/Lancastrian King Henry VII in ). RALPH DE BALDOCK, Chancellor, His Education and Rise, 17S. Death of Edward I., Accession of Edward II., Removal of De Baldock, His Death, Jurisdiction of Chancellor in the Reign of Edward I, Improvements in Law, Gratitude to Law Reformers, Law Books, CHAPTER XII.

CHANCELLORS DURING TIHE REIGN OF.Edward IV. built a magnificent shrine in the choir, over the tombs of his father and brother, and completed the works of the college, including the cloister.

{ 40} There is reason to believe that the young Duke of Gloucester received his knightly training in the use of arms from the age of fourteen, in the household of his cousin the Earl of.Edition used: Sir William Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of England in Four Books.

Notes selected from the editions of Archibold, Christian, Coleridge, Chitty, Stewart, Kerr, and others, Barron Field’s Analysis, and Additional Notes, and a Life of the Author by George Sharswood.

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